The best place for people to learn about your nonprofit in the digital age is your website. It has also become a place where you get donations, make partners, and get volunteers. What this means is that there should be extra care when building your nonprofit website – one that caters to the needs of your users.

To do this, there are certain elements that you need to pay attention to – including:

  • Your nonprofit website design
  • Website structure
  • Content on your nonprofit website
  • Website functionality

Let’s dig deeper into how these elements work together to make a workable nonprofit website

Nonprofit website design

The design of a website is very important. In fact, 94% of visitors to your website will form their first impression through its design. Great design includes a lot of things, from selecting vibrant colors to making sure that your color combinations are on point. It also involves studying your brand and selecting the colors that represent your brand the best possible way. Great design also has to do with using high quality imagery – either from brand colors, from volunteers or from partners to achieve the right aesthetics.

A big mistake not to make is to equate good design to only vibrant colors or good imagery. While these are all important, the most important thing is to tell a story through your designs. Thus, your design should be meaningful, and should give meaning to visitors – in understanding what you stand for and why you’re doing what you do.

Your nonprofit website structure

Think of your website structure as the only map on earth (because it is, on your website) – and the only thing that will lead the visitor to what they’re looking for. Build a website structure that’s easy to navigate and simple for the user to find their way. To do this, you need great navigation tools, search tools, and any other tool that you think will help users make good use of your nonprofit website.

Building an excellent website structure requires careful thought. Nonprofits need to think about the different website visitors when creating a structure. These include volunteers, partners, and donors. A structure should also inculcate web accessibility features, including inculcating features from the visually impaired, hearing impaired, mobile users, those who speak or read different language, and more.

Nonprofit website content

Telling stories. Explaining what you do and where you’re going. Your vision, mission, intensions, and projects. Everything is communicated through your content. Content is a vital part of achieving a workable nonprofit website’s dream – and it helps with navigation, site structure, and also compliments your website’s design. Content could be in the form of written word, video, and audio or a combination of all – designed to cater to each visitor’s needs.

When we say content, you should understand that your nonprofit website’s content includes everything – copy, blog posts, social media copy, and more. Nonprofits should also design their content in a way that is easy to update. Organizations that can, usually design their own content management system, others seek the help of nonprofit web development agencies when it comes to designing nonprofit content management systems. Whatever the case may be, make sure your content is fresh, updated, and caters to different website visitors.

Your nonprofit website functionality

What function is your nonprofit website built to perform? This part ensures that your website is serving a purpose and visitors are able to accomplish something on it.  Visitors should not see your website is not useful when they visit. These are some of the ways to achieve great functionality on your nonprofit website:

  • Buttons allowing visitors to donate to your nonprofit’s course
  • Ways for people to sign up as volunteers
  • Register buttons for visitors to participate in your conferences and events
  • Access your event calendar
  • Become email subscribers

Conclusion

Building a workable nonprofit website requires a lot of work, from design to site navigation.